ASL RESOURCE PAGE

ASL Resource Page

What is ASL?

American Sign Language (ASL) is a visual language. With signing, the brain processes linguistic information through the eyes. The shape, placement, and movement of the hands, as well as facial expressions and body movements, all play important parts in conveying grammatical information.

What can the Great Lakes provide?

  • Provides information, guidance and training on how to implement the Americans with Disabilities Act and other related laws;
  • Resources which include Deaf Communication Rights Card, Q&A booklets and factsheets.

To request resources please call (800) 949-4232 (V) or (312) 767-0377 (VP).

Videos

  • Communication Rights Card:
    The Great Lakes ADA Center discusses the right to effective communication per the Americans with Disabilities Act for Deaf and Hard of Hearing persons and offers a free resource to assist in self-advocacy. This resource is the size of a business card and lists information and references about obligations to provide accommodations for accessible and effective communication under the ADA. If you or someone you know is interested in acquiring one of these cards, please contact us at info@adagreatlakes.org.
  • ADA25: #3 of 25 -- Title I
    National Association of the Deaf presents an explanation of Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act in American Sign Language. Title I pertains to employment. The scope of Title I is broad, protecting employee rights in all stages of employment, including applying and hiring, job performance, job training, conditions, promotion and termination.
  • ADA25: #4 of 25 - Title II
    National Association of the Deaf presents an explanation of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act in American Sign Language. Title II of the ADA addresses the right of access to public services by individuals with disabilities, and stipulates what public entities must do to meet the needs of deaf and hard of hearing people.
  • ADA25: #5 of 25 - Title III
    National Association of the Deaf presents an explanation of Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act in American Sign Language. Title III of the ADA specifies that no individual shall be discriminated against on the basis of disability in the full and equal enjoyment of public accommodations, or privately run business open to the public. In the past, only businesses and service agencies receiving federal monies were required to make their facilities accessible to persons with disabilities. Title III, however, mandates the accessibility of all services, even those privately owned, and requires that all new places of public accommodation and commercial facilities be designed and constructed so as to be readily accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities.
  • ADA25: #6 of 25 -Title IV
    National Association of the Deaf presents an explanation of Title IV of the Americans with Disabilities Act in American Sign Language. Title IV of the ADA requires that telephone companies provide telecommunication relay services. The relay services must provide speech-impaired or hearing-impaired individuals who use non-voice terminal devices opportunities for communication that are equivalent to those provided to other customers. Also covered under ADA Title IV are Closed Captioning services.
  • Title V:
    The Great Lakes ADA Center presents a translation of Title V of the Americans with Disabilities Act in American Sign Language. Title V of the ADA contains supplemental regulations that are not explicitly covered in other parts of the ADA.
 

Last Updated on:
Thu Aug 11, 2016